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Reviews

The word is out across the country! Short Sugar’s Pit Bar-B-Q is what it’s all about!

Roadfood.com

“Short Sugar’s menu is vast, including breakfast, all kinds of sandwiches, and a burger roster that features the “teenage burger,” which is a double cheeseburger. I loved my chili dog, which is a raunchy little thing that arrives wrapped in wax paper. The dog is topped with a chili so fine that it is more a paste than hash. With a line of mustard, it seems a faultless dish – not necessarily delicious, certainly not fancy, but somehow addictive in the way that only the most ignominious chili dog can be.”

The Splendid Table

“Figure that you’ll smell like hickory smoke and pork after eating at Short Sugar’s. But no one minds because the whole-hog pit barbecue is simply glorious. The virtually sauceless (sauce is available on the side if you ask) meat comes two ways: on a coleslaw-heaped bun or on a plate with the slaw and hushpuppies on the side.”


Chow.com

“Short Sugar’s is, as you can see, super down-home, with open kitchen and open pit, and everyone involved talking and hanging out with you as you eat at the counter —plus lots of cross-talk with other customers. I vastly prefer this back-of-the-house ambiance, which is rare in North Carolina, though it suits barbecue so well.”

The Knightshift

“Well anyway I nuked up a plate of Short Sugar’s chopped barbecue in the microwave. And I almost used Short Sugar’s Barbecue Sauce on it, which is probably one of the strangest barbecue sauces around. I’m pretty sure some of the main ingredients are vinegar and brown sugar (some think soy sauce is in there too), but no tomatoes or any other ingredient you think goes into barbecue sauce. Definitely worth getting two or three bottles of the stuff if you ever visit them.”

MagazineUSA.com

“Starting in Ayden and finishing in Murphy, the North Carolina Barbecue Society Historic Barbecue Trail spotlights 25 stops that specialize in roasting pig the old-fashioned way – slowly over pits of wood or charcoal.”


Bob Garner’s Guide To North Carolina Barbecue

“In Bob Garner’s Guide to North Carolina Barbecue, Garner describes what he feels are the 100 best barbecue restaurants in North Carolina. They range from well-known establishments to holes in the wall located off the beaten track. Each entry includes some of the restaurant’s history, as well as a description of its ambiance, menu, and cooking method. It also includes its location and hours of operation.”


NC Barbecue Society Wall of Fame

“The mission of the North Carolina Barbecue Society (NCBS) is to preserve North Carolina’s barbecue history and culture and to secure North Carolina’s rightful place as the Barbecue Capital of the World. Our goal is to promote North Carolina as “the Cradle of ’Cue” and embrace all that is good about barbecue worldwide. As we strive to achieve these lofty goals we will be guided by the polar star that barbecue is all about good food, good friends and good times

To be included on the Wall of Fame, the inductee must have made major contributions of time/talents and services that promoted North Carolina barbecue and contributed to our rich barbecue heritage.”